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tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do whatever he wants without any oversight. >> i felt he was telling us, you guys don't exist. it's just me and
both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's so
on this situation with ian lee in cairo tonight. what's the situation right now? >> reporter: well, tom, it's 2:00 a.m. now in cairo. and the protests are still going on. we're still seeing clashes in and around tahrir square between the protesters and the police. we're seeing a range of things thrown back and forth. rocks, we've seen molotov cocktails, we've seen tear gas. there are reports of police shooting into the air to scare off protesters. this is a very intense scene we've seen. we haven't seen anything like this really since a year ago when we saw clashes, when we saw dozens of people killed. this has really been the most intense set of clashes since then and all these protesters are angry about that power grab you were describing where president morsi really has no one overseeing him. the judiciary, he has pushed that aside. he now has really full power and tomorrow, we're going to be watching closely, also, the judiciaries said they might strike basically grinding the whole country's court system to a halt in retaliation for this power grab and also need to point out there are have been
at cairo's tahrir square on friday and it was clear that's not the case. the demonstrators appeared to be as determined as ever and this time they're going after their current president. outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demands the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohammed morrissey. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> one man wants to do everything and nothing at all of what we want. >> on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took office in june. that order is to stay in place. he can do whatever he wants without any overs
on the young democracy. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. new developments today in tie cairo that could further entangle and muddy what is an already complicated conflict. we have confirmed that next week on december 4th a court in cairo will hear several cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue wi
it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and she never described it as a terror attack back then and that has outrained key republicans who find her comments very troubling. >> i don't think this is a matter of dishonesty. it was a matter again of responsibility. there was plenty of information out there which she has access to, which contradicted what she said. well you have, if you're telling the american people speaking for the white house, it was the white house that sent her out, you have the responsibility to make sure those facts are accurate. >> reporter: so they're looking at responsibility component of this, not so much dishonesty, there were allegations perhaps she was trying to help the white house cover up something. now it is going to the core what she knew and was she fundamentally wrong and came out and said spontaneous reaction as opposed to describing as a terror attack. ambassador rice will be meeting a few minutes from now to answer the questions from senator mccain and others who have problem with her statements
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the new egyptian president has basically, on paper, put himself above the law here saying the courts have no say, and obviously, there's a lot of people -- tens of thousands of egyptians -- who are not happy with it. morsi supporters say this was a necessary move to try to get rid of holdovers from the old regime of hosni mubarak. they say it's only temporary until they get a new constitution. but opponents are furious a
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
>> good morning, everyone, it's sunday, november 25th, i'm alisyn camerota. in cairo muslim brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants.
of the u.s. embassy in cairo is now closed. this after violent clashes cutting off access to the u.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we
, there was an cairo, withssion in callcondemning what they israeli aggression. >> there will be no peace, no security as long as occupation continues. >> president obama departed saturday for a trip to asia. he has been in touch with region, but the has backed israel as troops massing along the gaza border. the developments are fuelling of a drawn-out conflict. the israeli army has been to call up reservists, and the white house says israel has a right to attacks,self against blaming hamas for starting the conflict. >> new information in the deadly train crash in texas that killed four veterans. federal investigators say the of thethe morning train were activated the flowonds before crossed the tracks. the ntsb said the train started sounding its war 9 seconds float and thethe engineer used is emergency brake 5 seconds before the crash. dozens of local children who would not otherwise get a dinner this year had an amazing meal. father and listed his own kids to help? >> he did, a great way for his meaninglearn the true of thanksgiving. is the second year he has .rganized this festival need and he res
january. that development comes as delegations for both israel and hamas meet in cairo today. they're meeting with egyptian officials to try to advance those cease-fire talks. and egypt's president mohamed morsi will meet today with judges to explain his edict barring them from overturning any decision that he makes or any laws that he imposes until a new parliament is formed. reza sayah is in cairo this morning. let's start with mohamed morsi, please. >> yeah, good morning, soledad. a few thousand protesters still here in south tahrir squares, especially those who camped out over the past several days, still seeing some clashes. most of them triggered by what seem to be teenagers and twenty somethings out here looking for trouble. we also saw our first fatality of the protest last night on sunday in a northern city where a 15-year-old member of the muslim brotherhood youth movement was clubbed to death. at this point the brotherhood doesn't seem to be using that fatality as a rallying cry to shore up support. but at the same time, it doesn't seem to be any indication that this con
brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed yasser arafat's tomb for a second time. a dignified ceremony. the palestinian's lost leader has not been allowed
to unicef to provide education and trauma support for children and water and sanitation services. in cairo last week i called on other countries to increase their contribution to the relief effort which the u.n. has described as critically underfund. however, what is urgently needed is a political transition to new and legitimate leadership that reflects the will of the syrian people and that can end the violence and begin to rebuild the country is regional and international support. on the 13th of november, there was a major breakthrough in doha with the establishment of syrian and opposition forces which has been welcomed by many syrians. last friday i met the president and two of the vice presidents of the national coalition on their first visit to europe. i sought assurances from them in three areas. first, i urged them to commit themselves to gone -- build their political structures. second, i encouraged them to use the next friends of syria meeting -- which we hope will be held in morocco next month -- to set out a plan for syria's future in detail. >> and third, a clear commitment t
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
-fire for israel and hamas. any details have yet to be worked out. the next direct talks happen in k cairo. meanwhile, the military is not commenting on the long oh-range rockets, the same type that were fired into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in
, thousands of protesters spilling into the streets of cairo again this morning demanding president mohammed morsi be thrown out of office. they are angry over morsey's decision to give himself sweeping powers. a massive power grab on thursday into friday. peter doocy joins us live from d.c. with the latest. peter, this was frightening at how quick it happened and how it came immediately after susan rice praised what mr. morsey did there. >> right, dave. and mohammed morsi is actually egypt's first democratically elected president. but many of his people are protesting because he issued this decree that puts all his decisions in the past, present and future above judicial review. he can do whatever he wants and the lower courts can't. ' assembly writing egypt's new constitution can do so without any objections now, the u.s. state department issued a statement making their reservations about president morsey crystal clear and basically stating that the entire idea of the arab spring was the opposite of what's happening in egypt. the state department says, quote: one of the aspirations of the
. as the overall less than whether the cairo speech he delivered in 2009 or your repeated declaration of prevention of iran nuclear capabilities to not mistake the former for the latter. today as a historian it is the anniversary of my her favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east 70 years ago today president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement to the people of the middle east imagine a president saying this. praise unto you the compassion and merciful. me the blessing of god be upon you. the great day for you because we the american and holy warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa so just imagine the president praising the american in jihad of freedom. [laughter] if those are three broad lessons witter the three most urgent find your agenda? because dealing with the rand generally, brain down a side quickly but prevent change the collapse of one or more at additional regime especially monarchies. morocco has figured out how did its surv
and cairo. issues leading the east asia summit that president obama is an app. the death toll in the gaza strip surpassed 100 on monday. with evidence that an egyptian a truce is in the side. ben rose, the deputy national security adviser for strategic administration at the white house says clinton and obama have been talking about this threat to the trip. -- throughout the trip. they discussed the way forward. they concluded the best way to the dance discussions with leaders is for secretary clinton to take this trip beginning with our close partner, israel. and clinton's middle east talks do not include hamas leaders. they say the secretary will not meet with hamas, that states does not recognize diplomatically. clinton cut short her stay at the east asia summit to take this trip. headline in the "baltimore sun" -- middle east conflict puts the united states in a bind. israel risks other goals across the region. by all accounts, the damage to united states influence in the area is likely to grow if israel sends ground troops into gauze and, as it is threaded to do to stop hamas from fir
is taking pictures of some of zandt in cairo. -- some event in cairo. you knew it was and of effective look. -- an objective look. i do not know who is taking the pictures. they may be working for some small network because the network does not want to bring in its own cameraman. >> notice if you watch more than one newscast, notice the number of times you will see precisely the same video when it comes from overseas in large part because the networks do not have their own reporters, and they have brought it from the same source. . no. 2, what is wrong with having a local reporter covering the event? a local reporter speaks the language and knows the people. let's say the local reporter is reported from tehran and the local reporter knows if he or she makes a misstep, they are going to be arrested and thrown in jail. the american reporter may get thrown out of the country, but that is probably the worst that is going to happen. i find there is no willingness to believe objectivity in journalism is possible. i keep hearing there is no such thing as absolute objectivity, to which i say, when
. next week a court in cairo will attempt to decide whether it is even a constitutional move. reza sayah is live for us in cairo. before we talk about how he's justifying the powers, you're getting new information on a huge move from the muslim brotherhood. reza, are you with me? we're going to work on getting -- >> reporter: brooke, the muslim brotherhood has canceled their 1 million man demonstration. of course it could energize the opposition factions behind us with their 1 million man demonstration, but there is absolutely no indication at this point that the muslim brotherhood is losing support. remember, this is a powerful organization, one of the most powerful organizations in the political landscape, in egypt, and at this point, i think many people will look at this at face value, someone sensible in the muslim brotherhood made the decision they have competing demonstrations tomorrow that could be the potential for violence. several days have passed since the decrees and the outcome hasn't been pleasant. was this just a bad miscalculation by the president? >> not at all. it is a
egypt might go in all of this? >> i think egypt, look, it's quarter to a third of the arab world. cairo is one of the historical centers of the arab world. we don't have a good reading on where these guys are going, the muslim brotherhood. i'm not sure they necessarily do. we don't know how much to take literally what they say and write. they've got their internal politics, the party, the government. there's issues between them and other forces in egypt. they came into government fairly narrowly. but they're clearly trying to deepen their base. so everyone's watching really closely what they're doing with the rewriting of egypt's constitution, how these people want to consolidate power. what they say in the middle east, it's one thing to win an election. that's the easy part. are they willing to lose an election, to set up a political dynamic where there's a level playing field? i don't think we know the answer. >> whenever we're talking israel and hamas, you have to think about iran and its role. some of the long-range missile sites they bombed yesterday in those 50 strikes had bombs s
in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good new
it is the cairo speech that you delivered in 2009 or your repeated and important declarations on prevention of iran's nuclear capabilities, actions matter most. don't mistake the former for the latter. and today i just have to step out of my role for a moment because as a historian today is the anniversary of my favorite ever presidential statement on the middle east. 70 years ago today, president franklin delano roosevelt issued the following statement for the people of the middle east. just imagine a president saying that. praise be to you and the name of god the passionate, the merciful. may god be upon you. this is a great day for you because behold a week, the american warriors have arrived. we have come here to fight the great jihad of freedom. we have come to set you free. today is the 70th anniversary of the landing on north africa and prisoner agreed jihad of american freedom once again but we don't remember that because words matter so much less than actions. if those are three broad lessons were the three most urgent issues on your agenda here won't repeat the words of my colleag
that there are talks going none cairo right now with the egyptians acting as an incident intermediary to try have some expire that deal could happen within 24 to 48 hours which might delay the israeli ground assault a little bit. however, the israelis say they are already ready. they have authorization for 75,000 reservists to be called up. and in this part of the country, this that is a lot. can i tell you from driving around in israel that in just four or five days since this all began, israel has changed from seemingly normal to all of the sudden a country on a war footing understandably because of the millions of their people are under assault every day as we stand all around southern israel. we hear the air raid sirens go off. we know that the militants are firing out of gaza towards these open areas. just hoping that some level that they might hit an idf position. so. israeli army forces that are massing here. back to you in new york. >> leland, you talk about militant positions, interesting that the israeli government, specifically benjamin netanyahu's office tweeting this morning and if you ca
on the streets of cairo. back to you. >> steve: all right. live in jerusalem with the very latest. thank you. >> gretchen: and now the rest of today's headlines for monday. thousands of workers protesting today demanding justice for a factory fire. this happened in bangladesh. 112 people died. crowds are block streets and throwing rocks at the burned out garment factory, many workers were trapped in the building because if you can believe this, there were no emergency exits for them. there are reports that some of the clothes being made there were for wal-mart, sears, and the clothing line of sean colmes. >>> in two hours, west virginia congresswoman shelly moore capito will announce her candidacy for senate. she was just elected to her 7th term in congress is a pro choice republican. she will run for democrat jay rockefeller's seat. the 75-year-old held that seat since 1984. >>> here is a question for you, should a mentally handicapped person be executed for committing murder? that's the question that will be debated in one courtroom this morning. for the next two weeks, lawyer also argue t
understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the chances are actually fairly small. egypt has enough problems with it is with fighting militants next to gaza. egypt says it still respects the camp david peace accord signed with israel back in the late 1970s. obviously, we can expect egyptian politicians and leaders to make as much political hay as possible over this gaza violence, but it's highly unlikely that egypt has really the wherewithal or desire to get sucked into that conflict. i know from speaking to many egyptians, they don't have an appetite for it. they may sympathize with the people of gaza, but that sympathy does not extend to an eagerness or willingness to engage or become involved militarily in that conflict. >> all right, ben. in jerusalem this morning. thanks. >>> coming up later, soledad will be speaking to israel's deputy foreign minister. that's in our 7:00 hour. >>> here at home, president obama will have the four top leaders of congress over to the white house today to begin tal
more on cairo, egypt. that's where intense negotiations are taking place as we understand it. egypt is trying to mediate a truce between palestinian factions and israel. hamas made clear it feels it is in the driver's seat here. it says it will not lay down its arms or stop firing rockets until israel blocks on the territory. it is securing guarantees from israel lit not target hamas or any other palestinian leaders as it did on wednesday p when it killed senior member of hamas' military wing. the israelis say that it is in the driver's seat. it would not stop its aerial assault and not stop possible ground invasion unless hamas halts all rocket fire into southern israel. obviously you can imagine difficult road ahead. right now egypt is meeting with other key players in the region. including the prime minister of turkey, u.n. secretary general moon as well as the prime minister. intense negotiations to avert a ground war in the coming day. >> entire world watching. thank you very much. >>> when we come back, one analyst says the recent sell-off in apple is insanely insane. he is go
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)

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